television programmes


television programmes
(a weekly programme schedule—CCTV 1)
The first TV broadcast in China occurred in May 1958. However, TV did not become the most important mass medium until the last two decades of the twentieth century, when television sets became more commonly available. Until 1993, only CCTV (Chinese Central Television) had national coverage, while provincial and municipal stations were technically restricted to local broadcasting. The situation changed in 1993 when local stations began to transmit their programmes through satellite, which has increased the number of channels available to each region from an average of five in the early 1980s to the present number of over thirty.
The number of TV programmes multiplied in the 1990s due to the adaptation of programme concepts from Euroamerican countries (see television formats). For example, news programmes in the form of a combination of journalistic reportage and commentaries Oriental Horizon (Dongfang shikong) and an in-depth report and commentary on current social issues Focus Interview (Jiaodian fangtan) were introduced in 1993 and 1994 respectively (see television magazines); in 1996 talk shows like Tell It Like It Is (Shihua shishuo) were added (see television talk shows); and in 1999 a programme designed to spread legal knowledge regarding everyday situations, Today’s Legal Advice (Jinri shuofa), began. There has also been an increase in specialized programmes. CCTV alone now has increased to twelve channels. Only CCTV 1 still attempts to provide a full variety of programmes while the others each have their special area of coverage.
This weekly programme schedule offered below is based on CCTV 1, a channel that supplies a majority of programming formats currently used in China. CCTV 1 programmes are divided into ‘fixed programmes’ (guding jiemu) and variable programmes. The ‘fixed’ programmes are the same regardless of which day of the week it is, while, of course, other programmes vary. The ‘fixed’ programmes are divided into early morning, early afternoon and prime-time slots.
The CCTV 1 fixed morning programme includes: Morning News Update (Gundong xinwen: Zao xinwen, 6.00–6.30); Fitness (Baixing jianshen, 6.30–7.00); Oriental Horizon (7.00–7.45 and 7.00–8.00 on Sundays); Eight O’Clock News (Xinwen zao badian, 8.00–8.35); Focus Interview (8.35–8.50); and a programme for the elderly, Evening Sun (Xiyang hong, 8.50–9.25). Some local stations also have morning newscasts, such as Good Morning Beijing (Beijing, ninzao) by Beijing Station, but local news programmes are less comprehensive. The ‘fixed’ afternoon programmes on CCTV 1 start with News in 30 Minutes (Xinwen 30 fen, 12.00–12.30), followed by Today’s Legal Advice (Jinri shuofa, 12.40–13.00); a relay of Oriental Horizon (13.00–13.40); Cartoon City (Donghua cheng, 17.30–18.06); and Big Pinwheel (18.09–18.59). The last is designed for and performed by children. Prime-time starts at 19.00 with a national and international news bulletin CCTV News (Xinwen lianbo, 19.00–19.30). CCTV News still represents the authoritative voice of the state and the Communist Party. Local stations generally start with CCTV News and continue with local news. The newscast is followed by the weather forecast (19.31–19.38), Focus Interview (19.38–19.54) and Science and Technology (Keji bolan, 19.55–20.04). As a form of family-oriented entertainment, TV drama enjoys a prestigious position among TV programmes. Popular and newly released TV dramas are presented during prime-time (20.05–21.00). CCTV 1 prime-time finishes with Evening News (Xianzai bopao, 21.00–21.14), except on Sundays when it ends with Tell It Like It Is (21.15–21.59).
The variable programmes include variable morning, evening and late evening broadcasts. They change depending on whether it is Monday-Saturday or Sunday, as well as among the weekdays themselves. Monday’s programmes can be contrasted with Sunday’s as an example of these differences, with the understanding that such programmes do change from day to day. CCTV 1 variable morning and afternoon broadcasting consists mainly of educational programmes, life skills and entertainment. On Monday morning CCTV 1 provides: Highlights from Cinema (Yinmu caifeng, 9.20–9.49); Science and Technology (9.50–9.59); News Update (10.00–10.10); the children’s game show Open Sesame (10.10–10.22); TV drama (10.23–11.09); cooking demonstrations on Everyday Gourmet (Tiantian yinshi, 11.10–11.09); a programme for university students The Twelfth Broadcasting Studio (Shi’er yanboshi, 11.20–11.54); and finally a programme designed to popularize a new song each week called The Song of the Week (Meizhou yige, 11.55–11.59).
CCTV 1 late Sunday morning broadcasting consists of: You, Me, He or She (Ni, wo, ta, 9.50–10.25), a programme featuring audience participation in the analysis of selected programmes from all the CCTV channels; Three-Star Knowledge Express (Sanxing zhili kuaiche), a game show for middle school students; Weekend Health (Zhoumo jiankang zhilu); and finally This Week (Benzhou 11.40–11.59), a review of major social and cultural events of the week. Local stations tend to use this time slot for TV drama, MTV and other light entertainment.
Variable Monday afternoon programmes (14.10–18.59) include many from the fixed schedule, but also include TV drama, sports programmes and other forms of entertainment; a replay of Science and Technology, The Song of the Week and Daily Gourmet. Sunday afternoon programming includes: A World of Fine Arts (Meishu xinkong, 14.00–14.34); The Second Starting Line (Di’er qipaoxian, 14.35–15.29), a programme for middle school students; Zhengda Theatre (Zhengda juchang, 15.30–17.20), introducing film and theatrical work mostly authored by artists of foreign countries; and Zhengda Showbits (Zhengda zongyi, 17.21–18.00), a comprehensive programme of cultural and artistic appreciation.
Late evening shows are mainly intended for mature viewers. On one particular Monday during the World Cup, the programme included international news, sports news and World Cup history (22.00–23.05); followed by a Special Sports Programme: I Love the World Cup (Tiyu zhuangti: wo ai shijiebie). The Sunday programme also includes: Arts Viewpoint (Yiyuan fengjingxian, 00.22–00.50); and Three-Star Knowledge Express (Sanxing zhili kuaiche, 01.22–01.35). At other times, the late evening may include a TV drama (approximately 23.00–1.22). CCTV 1 broadcasting finishes around 2.00 while some local stations run around the clock. Apart from the fact that there are no religious or explicitly sexual programmes on Chinese TV, Chinese TV programming is becoming more similar in content and format to programming internationally.
Donald, Stephanie H., Keane, Michael and Yin, Hong (eds) (2002). Media in China: Consumption, Content and Crisis. London: Routledge.
Hong, Junhao (1998). The Internationalization of Television in China: The Evolution of Ideology, Society, and Media Since the Reform. Westport: Praeger.
Lull, James (1991). China Turned On: Television, Reform, and Resistance. London: Routledge.
HE DONGHUI
(a weekly programme schedule—CCTV 1)
The first TV broadcast in China occurred in May 1958. However, TV did not become the most important mass medium until the last two decades of the twentieth century, when television sets became more commonly available. Until 1993, only CCTV (Chinese Central Television) had national coverage, while provincial and municipal stations were technically restricted to local broadcasting. The situation changed in 1993 when local stations began to transmit their programmes through satellite, which has increased the number of channels available to each region from an average of five in the early 1980s to the present number of over thirty.
The number of TV programmes multiplied in the 1990s due to the adaptation of programme concepts from Euroamerican countries (see television formats). For example, news programmes in the form of a combination of journalistic reportage and commentaries Oriental Horizon (Dongfang shikong) and an in-depth report and commentary on current social issues Focus Interview (Jiaodian fangtan) were introduced in 1993 and 1994 respectively (see television magazines); in 1996 talk shows like Tell It Like It Is (Shihua shishuo) were added (see television talk shows); and in 1999 a programme designed to spread legal knowledge regarding everyday situations, Today’s Legal Advice (Jinri shuofa), began. There has also been an increase in specialized programmes. CCTV alone now has increased to twelve channels. Only CCTV 1 still attempts to provide a full variety of programmes while the others each have their special area of coverage.
This weekly programme schedule offered below is based on CCTV 1, a channel that supplies a majority of programming formats currently used in China. CCTV 1 programmes are divided into ‘fixed programmes’ (guding jiemu) and variable programmes. The ‘fixed’ programmes are the same regardless of which day of the week it is, while, of course, other programmes vary. The ‘fixed’ programmes are divided into early morning, early afternoon and prime-time slots.
The CCTV 1 fixed morning programme includes: Morning News Update (Gundong xinwen: Zao xinwen, 6.00–6.30); Fitness (Baixing jianshen, 6.30–7.00); Oriental Horizon (7.00–7.45 and 7.00–8.00 on Sundays); Eight O’Clock News (Xinwen zao badian, 8.00–8.35); Focus Interview (8.35–8.50); and a programme for the elderly, Evening Sun (Xiyang hong, 8.50–9.25). Some local stations also have morning newscasts, such as Good Morning Beijing (Beijing, ninzao) by Beijing Station, but local news programmes are less comprehensive. The ‘fixed’ afternoon programmes on CCTV 1 start with News in 30 Minutes (Xinwen 30 fen, 12.00–12.30), followed by Today’s Legal Advice (Jinri shuofa, 12.40–13.00); a relay of Oriental Horizon (13.00–13.40); Cartoon City (Donghua cheng, 17.30–18.06); and Big Pinwheel (18.09–18.59). The last is designed for and performed by children. Prime-time starts at 19.00 with a national and international news bulletin CCTV News (Xinwen lianbo, 19.00–19.30). CCTV News still represents the authoritative voice of the state and the Communist Party. Local stations generally start with CCTV News and continue with local news. The newscast is followed by the weather forecast (19.31–19.38), Focus Interview (19.38–19.54) and Science and Technology (Keji bolan, 19.55–20.04). As a form of Viewers can also participate in on-line discussion following the show.
Friends is hosted by Wang Gang and airs on CCTV 2. It follows the format of introducing a well-known celebrity who reminisces with family, friends and acquaintances. Live talk shows such as CCTV 2’s Dialogue and its studio-recorded English-language counterpart on CCTV 9 provide a vehicle for experts, including foreign academics and business persons, to exchange views about economics, international relations and social issues.
See also: radio and TV hotlines (rexian) and call in shows
MICHAEL KEANE

Encyclopedia of contemporary Chinese culture. . 2011.

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